Atelier Lack

Atelier Lack

It is austere and profound studies that make great painters and sculptors. one lives one’s live on this foundation, and if it is lacking, one will only be mediocre. [Fanny Field Herring. Jean-Leon Gorome. Cassell Publishing Co.. New York. 1892. p. vi. preface.]
—Jean-Leon Genime

The sorest misfortune is when your views are in advance of your work. [lean Paul Richter. The Notebooks of Leonardo da Met Dover Publications. Inc.. New York. 1970. Vol. I. p. 291. Another translation reads. -The supreme tragedy is when theory outstrips performance.”‘
—Leonardo da Vinci

When I was nine years old I decided to be a representational painter. I took art classes throughout junior and senior high school. After high school I attended college and art school where, for four years, I was discouraged by the arrogance, ineptitude and orthodoxy of my art instructors. In 1971, I left in frustration, determined to study art on my own. I immersed myself in the work of Howard Pyle and his students. Shortly thereafter. I saw a small, impressionist landscape painting on the gift table at a wedding reception. To my eye, it was skillfully executed. Upon inquiry, I was introduced to the artist, who worked at Art Instruction Schools, a correspondence school that taught painting by mail. I shared my frustration and asked if he could teach me how to paint. He declined, but referred me to an artist who had recently opened a small studio-school in Minneapolis. He said it could be just what I was looking for. The artist’s name was Richard Lack.